The lowdown

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Serivce-learning through printmaking in the Roaring Fork Valley, CO since 2015.

NON-PROFIT PARTNER

Future Fashion LINE Development 

by The Progressors




“In a world on the brink, we choose unity and hope by re-imagining garments of the past, constructed from the discarded waste of our present into looks for our future.”


Six teen apprentices from 4 schools have been working together with 3 local artists to create the fashion line, The History of the Future by The Progressors.

The team has come together to collectively create a completely upcyclced line of 6 looks. They all have advocated for each others ideas, shared their unique design aestetics, learning to trust their instincts and work collaboratively to problem solve this incredible line. 

Starting with sketches and conversation the team has quickly moved to creation of a killer line made entirly from reclaimed materials and supplies. 




Now in its 3rd year, Carbondale Arts’ Creative Apprentice Program pays teens to work with local artists to create works of community value. This youth-driven program supports and values teens of all backgrounds by giving them a platform to develop and express their unique perspectives through exposure to creative professions.

As two organizations with complementary missions, this collaboration with the Project Shop celebrates their community-based, service-learning arts education with the Creative Apprentice Program’s youth employment and career preparedness initiatives.



This years Carbondale Arts Creative Apprenticeshop Program has been facilitated by The Project Shop and our ReWear Upcycling Initiative. 


A CORE TENET of this Initiative is to only used reclaimed supplies and used equipment.

Thank you


Ragged Mountain
Rebecca Lodge/Near New
Katie Leonitis
Georgia Chamberlain
Erica Balderson
Sam Harvey
Deborah Jones
Juliana Forbes
Kat Rich
Teresa Booth Brown
Seeking Donations:

  • Workwear/ Carhartts
  • Puffy Jackets/
  • Techincal Gear/backpacks

  • Thread
  • Fasteners

  • Industrial Sewing Machine
  • Iron
  • Garmet Steamer








Carbondale Creative District

Reina katzenberger

January 2024


Featured Creative Interview
CARBONDALE CREATIVE DISTRICT WEBSITE


Local artist Reina Katzenberger is a busy woman, with several irons in the fire. She lives and breathes creativity. We were delighted to get a glimpse of what generates her artistic momentum.

Can you give us a brief overview of your career or life path as an artist?

“I was raised in an active community of artists, thinkers, educators, and creators. From a young age, being an artist felt more of a way of life than something you did. I am an artist who teaches, an artist who makes dinner, and an artist who votes. Professionally, I have not pursued commercializing my artwork, but have been more excited by finding ways to engage different demographics—feeling the inspiration of different perspectives and life experiences working together. I am grateful to be able to say that success for me looks like sharing knowledge, techniques, and opportunities—supporting people being creative.”


How would you describe the multitude of (amazing) creative endeavors you have going on and what you are working on right now?

“I am working on leveraging strengths and collaborating. There are amazing organizations in the valley doing specific things really well, so I am focusing on collaborating and collectively pooling resources to work together to serve our community. We have a wealth of knowledge, experience, and energy already working towards creating amazing artistic opportunities. I want to celebrate that, learn from it, and give back.

Right now, through Feb 2, I am hosting ‘art in process’ at The Art Base in Basalt, where the gallery becomes a public space for conversation and creativity. This year’s installation focuses on What does it take for a community art center to thrive? and is a celebration of what we can achieve together when people show up. I will be present each day (Tuesday-Saturday 12-5 pm) to support both individual and collaborative art-making in a safe and welcoming environment. I am also diving into facilitating this year’s Creative Apprenticeship Program by Carbondale Arts in collaboration with The Project Shop’s ReWear Upcycling Initiative. We are digging into the creative process, design, and production of a fashion line for this year’s Green is the New Black Fashion Show. This is a collaboration between teenage apprentices, teaching artists, and community members of all ages showing up to help share knowledge and produce a killer line, exploring the concept of Future Fashion.

Receiving the 2023 Arts in Society grant for our Community Service Print Projects was instrumental in feeling like these types of projects were feasible full-time. Launching as a non-profit formalized our mission. We are a creative incubator and hands-on learning production facility, providing arts education through service-learning print projects, empowering student-artists to share their voices on critical issues, fostering conversation and community engagement. I love the projects—students and community coming together and collaborating at the Project Shop.”



Your space is at SAW, which is a cornerstone of the creative community in Carbondale. Can you paint a picture of your space and tell us why your space and SAW are important for Carbondale?

”The idea of the Project Shop really started with wanting to creatively problem solve the question, “What is your project?” and have the resources, equipment, and community engagement to manifest those ideas.

In 2016, a perfect location opened up at SAW (Studios for Arts + Works) which is a collaborative space for creative professionals and professional creatives. There is no formal structure to SAW, other than a building, which means it really depends on the people there to make it what they want. This type of collective community making—without any external or top down mandate—is a unique opportunity. We each make it what it is, some seasons are quiet, some crazy, but it affords us the chance to support each other and see all of the different ways to be and create as artists and makers.”


You seamlessly blend your creativity with social/community issues in such an approachable and accessible way. Can you tell about this approach to your work and what inspires that approach?

”I have been thinking about this a lot lately. I basically regard the creative process as a collective force for a better future.

Feeling safe enough, and trusting oneself enough to express something, sounds simple, but I think it is revolutionary, in that it’s integral to a strong and healthy society. Students who find their voices tend to actively listen, participate, share, and see their lives as part of a larger system. When we engage this way, we become better citizens. We consider our well-being dependent on each other's well-being. Small steps in this direction are sometimes all we have, but each gesture begins to make real the truth that we belong to each other. In my experience, when students are invited to engage through making art, they no longer feel outside of issues they care about, but respected actors, activists, and artists.”

Find more about Reina and her work at reinakatzenberger.com and/or follow her on social media @max.ink.creative and @the.project.shop


‘art in process’ interactive installation, 2024, The Art Base, Basalt, CO



The Art Base, Basalt Colorado

Art in Process

Jan 2 – Feb 2,  2024


Reina is on loan for the month of January to The Art Base in Basalt for ART IN PROCESS, her installation and interactive studio takeover of the street side gallery in downtown Basalt. Please take a look at this great article - thanks to Sarah Chase Shaw @ Aspen Sojourner - describing the project celebrating its 3rd year.


Jan 2 - Feb 2 • Tues-Sat 12-5pm
Friday, Feb 2rd 5-7pm, Closing Celebration
The Art Base directions
 
Follow @art.in.process.2024
More at reinakatzenberger.com
I AM BECAUSE WE ARE

For the month of January 2024, the gallery becomes a public space for conversation and creativity without pressure. I am firmly committing to showing up each day to support both individual and collaborative art-making in a safe and welcoming environment.

This year’s installation focuses on what it takes for a community art center to thrive, and is a celebration of what we can achieve when people show up. As a product of the community that founded this art center, my work and this installation is in honor of my history with The Art Base, and the promise of its future

The west gallery wall displays a growing grid of small square canvas pieces made by visitors. The east wall shows larger pieces, including an 8’ x 12’ printed and painted mural collage from last year’s installation of art in process. A logbook of artifacts, stories, and images shared by participants is on display and printed out daily.



We are all exercising the connection between our eyes, brain, heart, hands, space and materials. Remembering it is not about making something pretty, it is about showing up and trying, playing, listening and working towards seeing the world in a fresh way. Join us by connecting, supporting and celebrating the creative process.




Hannah stoll


CSA: WEAR IT! Art Shirt

Celebrating comfort in public space for everyone. 

 
Your support allows us to empower these young, emerging and curious artists to share their voices through high-quality limited edition print goods.
These limited editions go to our CSA subscribers. Join us today.
 


 

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Hannah Stoll (b. 1997, NYC) was raised in Vermont where she first learned to paint in oil. She began a dedicated studio practice after graduating from Colorado College in 2020 and moving to the Roaring Fork Valley. There, Stoll started working with local artists and creative nonprofits, exhibiting paintings in group and solo shows around the state. Stoll became a 2022 grantee of the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation and attended a 3-month long residency with GlogauAir (Berlin) in winter 2023. She held a solo exhibition at The Art Base (Basalt, CO) in July 2023, shortly before starting her MFA in Painting at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts.
 
-involvement with shop-
I first got involved with the Project Shop when I started renting a studio space nearby in 2021. I began with a pretty limited knowledge of screen printing, but Reina patiently taught me each step of the process as we printed various t-shirt orders and editions. I loved gaining confidence and muscle-memory with this kind of tactile skill. Printmaking involves so much troubleshooting and creative jerryrigging, as well as a kind of adherence to protocol that does not come naturally to me. So good for my patience and reward pathways!


The shop is a constant revolving door of creative people bringing in new ideas—this has built up an incredible extended community. Though I’ve moved away from the valley, I am very happy to be able to share this CSA design in collaboration with local Project Shop artists.


-The design-
This screenprint is an interpretation of an oil painting I made in 2022. I was interested in the patterns formed by people in public and the feeling of being one among many. This brought me to people-watching in public parks—I made distant sketches in such a way that nobody retained individual characteristics but kept their posture, leaning in or away from someone, huddled in little groups having their own afternoons. I was curious about the strangers and projected my
imagination onto their lives. These sketches ultimately informed a series of paintings I named “living background.”

As members of local communities and an incomprehensibly huge global one, coexisting in public spaces is the most natural thing in the world, and for me only became noteworthy after it became scarce during the pandemic. I began to see how passive inclusion among strangers was vitally important for my social animal brain. When we were finally able to do it again, it seemed to carry the positive energy of the entire community.

There is a sweet spot—no virus, no tolerance for discrimination, and the prioritization of building and maintaining public spaces for the benefit of all.

This t-shirt design, which I hope you wear to parks, libraries, subways, and mountain fairs, is about comfort in public spaces for everyone.



USING responsible MATERIALS



  • a crazy-soft sustainable tee
  • 50% polyester from recycled plastic bottles.25% organic cotton.25% Tencel™ Modal. 4.2 ounces





Subscribe today to make sure you don’t miss any of these goodies:
Wear it {art shirt}, Mail it {mail art} and Use it {art object}.


Your subscription allows us to empower these young, emerging and curious artists to share their voices through tangible, high-quality limited edition print goods.



This Community Service Project is made possible in part by the 2022/2023 Arts in Society grant supporting cross sector arts projects that illustrate artistic excellence, broaden the understanding of the role arts play in society, demonstrate cross-sector work, exhibit cultural relevancy, foster community engagement, and present opportunities for shared learning.



COMMUNITY SERVICE PROJECT

Future Fashion Community project

ReWear Upcycling Initiative + Carbondale Arts Creative Apprentice Program




Program expansion...
A collaboration between @CarbondaleArts Creative Apprentice Program and our ReWear Upcycling Initiative. 10 Week Paid Opportunity. No Experience Necessary.

Beginning January 10th project apprentices will work under the mentorship of lead artists and collaboratively with peers to develop a cohesive fashion line through hands-on learning. Participants will be encouraged to bring their individual perspectives to the process and to experiment with style and technique while developing wearable clothing.

A variety of techniques will be explored including garment decoration, screen printing, embroidery, vinyl applique, sewing and construction. Community production days will include additional ReWear shop artists and community participants to share their knowledge and skills with participants.

https://www.carbondalearts.com/apprenticeship-sessions/apply-now-community-fashion-project


ReWear is a new community initiative where unwanted clothing is given a new life through artistic expression. Motivated by reducing clothing waste, lightly worn donated clothing will be revamped via various decorative techniques.

Through this service-learning project, community members will discover more about garment decoration, screen printing, embroidery, vinyl applique, etc.




Learn More here. 

Donate:


CORE TENET of our programming is to only used reclaimed supplies and used equipment.

SEEKING SUPPLIES
- rip stop patching material
- fabric, leather, upholstery scraps
- heat transfer vinyl scraps
- embroidery & darning supplies
- eyelets, brads, rivets and tools
- zippers, buttons & snaps

SHOW UP:


Community Workshop days are offered multiple times throughout the year. Participants are welcome to bring their own items of clothing to work on, or they are encouraged to decorate one of the donated pieces of clothing for sale to raise funds for our service-projects.

Dates coming soon. 




This Community Service Project is made possible in part by the 2022/2023 Arts in Society grant supporting cross sector arts projects that illustrate artistic excellence, broaden the understanding of the role arts play in society, demonstrate cross-sector work, exhibit cultural relevancy, foster community engagement, and present opportunities for shared learning.



{19-1392} service project Reflection


UPDATE on safeguarding reproductive healthcare.




Hi Everyone, I want to start by thanking you all for the support on project 19-1392: safe access for Women’s Healthcare. As of June 28th, we’ve successfully raised $630 for Glenwood’s Planned Parenthood, and we hope to continue supporting reproductive clinics in the Rocky Mountains!!! In light of recent events, we’ve decided to do round-two of printing for additional orders!!

Since June 24th, I have been mourning the death of women’s autonomy, the death of women’s access to protected healthcare, and the death of America’s promise to liberty and the right to privacy. The SCOTUS decision to gut the protections set forth by Roe not only enable 26 states to restrict abortion access, but also 25 states to completely ban abortion proceedures. Yet public interests contest our legislation reality– “about six-in-ten Americans say abortion should be legal in some or all cases” (Pew Research Center).

Today, as a young woman in America, I am angered, saddened, and disappointed in our legislation system. Yet though it can feel like our hands are tied, we must remind ourselves that our legislators are meant to serve us and laws are supposed to represent our interests! Upon interviewing Rebecca Binion (Glenwood Planned Parenthood director), she pointed out a few ways for us to continuing the safeguard of aboriton access in CO: listen to people’s stories, use your voice to talk about health equity, support the organizations that are advocating for reproductive rights and justice, and most importantly, VOTE! (I encourage you all to go to read the rest of my interview with rebecca!)

Heavyweight Sweatshirt


  • 50% US Cotton / 50% Polyester
  • 100% of our fabric cutting scraps are recycled into fiber and used in new products
  • 33% of the energy used to manufacture our products comes from renewable resources
  • 8.0 ounce
Read about the sustainability

$40







Eco/organic T-shirt


This tee is carbon neutral!
  • 50% polyester from recycled plastic bottles.
  • 25% organic cotton.
  • 25% Tencel™ Modal.
  • 4.2 ounce
Read about their impact


Eco/organic Totebag


8 oz. Organic Cotton Twill Everyday Tote






Limited Edition Print 11” x 15”


Original print on paper made from recycled t-shirts.








More About the Design

Medusa:
In Greek Mythology, Medusa is painted as a monster that turns men into stone. Yet deeply misunderstood is the sexual assault written in her origin story and protection her snakes offer. In the design, I chose the allusion to Medusa’s story as a metaphor for the villanization and criminalization of a woman’s decision to get an abortion. Societal values and expectations force women to carry the enormous weight of guilt. But I’m a firm believer that we should remove this stigma of shaming women for making a decision relative to their lives. Everyone deserves kindness, love, and respect, even if their decisions don’t align with another’s beliefs.


Lady Justice:
The crown and scale of Lady Justice are sympathetic to the injustices imposed upon a woman’s autonomy over her physical and mental health due to the lack of safe medical resources. The paradox of the issue lies within the personal freedom protection offered by the 14th Amendment and the lack of “right to privacy” for women when it comes to reproductive health care. Additionally, extreme policies regarding abortion access does not accurately represent voters interests in red or blue states. And beyond our flawed legislative system, the symbols of Lady Justice also unveils the gray area between the planes of justice and morality.

19-1392:
19-1392 is the doc number assigned to the underlying case: Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, whcih was filed 3/19/2018 regarding the constitutionality of a Mississippi law that banned abortions after 15 weeks of preganacy. 

Inspo:
Passionate about the sociological crossroads of policy and society, I am always eager to learn about the relations between historical relevance and current events. And as a young women in America today, abortion legislations directly impacts my body, my mental health, and the trajectary of my life. Growing up in a conservative family, I am always forced to wrestle with the morality behind the weight of such decisions. Therefore, the purpose of this art piece is not only a method of advocating for my rights, but also a bridge between the gaps of my parents’ and I’s worldviews.
Artist Statement
As a young women in America today, abortion legislations directly impacts my body, my mental health, and the trajectary of my life. And growing up in a conservative family, I am always forced to wrestle with the morality behind the weight of such decisions. Therefore, the purpose of this art piece not only advocates for my rights, but also bridges the gap between my parents’ and my worldviews.

Bio
Growing up in the metropolis of Shanghai, China and making the odyssey to Cleveland, and then again to the Rocky Mountains, Mandy’s entire life is governed by movement and the excitement that accompanies exploration of the new. Taking art lessons since the age of 7, her art mainly revolved around traditional styles and mediums of acrylics and pencil. Driven by her personal identity as an Asian American and her involvement within the outdoor community, Mandy’s artistic style has evolved to integrate issues of racial and enviornmental justice. She is also experimenting with new mediums and styles such as: textiles, pointillism, ink, and now print-making at the Project Shop. Recently graduated from Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Mandy is taking a Gap Year to travel, before attending Pitzer College, where she is excited to participate in Claremont’s local art clubs and to explore Pitzer’s muralistic art scene.

About the Process
Holding myself accountable to give the project an informed foundation, I dedicated time to researching abortion rights and interviewed Rebecca Binion, director of the Planned Parenthood in Glenwood Springs. I distilled the web of information into one precise message: access to abortion is about providing safe health care for women, which should be an issue between a woman and her doctor.

Finally, I went back to the drawing board, drifting into my imaginative space and away from the logos and overthinking. Through the act of losing myself in creativity, I was able to weave meaningful elements into the design (which you can read more about at TheProjectShop.org). And, most importantly, I was able to see my designs come to life on sweatshirts, totes, tees and posters. The experience of carefully printing each piece of cloth, and knowing that 100% of my dedication to the project will be donated to Planned Parenthood, is truly rewarding.


Funding:
100% of profits made from the products will be donated to supporting @PlannedParenthood. Having reproductive healthcare facilities are important as it pertains to providing safe, accessible contraceptives, sex-ed, STI testings and treatments, and abortions. Additionally, to supplement the art project, I have contacted Rebecca Binion, the director of the Glenwood Planned Parenthood, for an interview regarding access to reproductive health care in the valley and how the potential overturn of Roe may impact our local community. You can check out the article @soprissun.







{19-1392} Interview with Planned parenthood Executive director


Mandy Lei & Rebecca Binion


Do you think reproductive health care is widely accessible to most women in the valley?

The Glenwood Spring Health Center is the only Planned Parenthood west of the Denver area in mid-Utah. We serve a wide geographic region, not only the Roaring Fork Valley. We are proud to offer comprehensive reproductive health care and that includes abortion care.

Health disparities that impact too many people, and the Roaring Fork Valley is not immune to that. Many patients that we serve lack any form of insurance, indicating that patients can’t afford, or don’t qualify for coverage.

Do you notice any disparities between abortion/reproductive health care access for women in the valley? (whether that is in terms of class, race, etc.)

  • Only some many providers accept Medicaid
  • Over 30% of the patients we serve speak only Spanish.
  • We care for all patients, and every patient is offered financial support if needed.

What is the most common demographic make-up for women seeking abortion access in the valley?


1 in 3 people will have an abortion in their lifetime, of all backgrounds. Abortion is a very common part of health care.

What is one of the most difficult discussions you have had on the topic of abortion rights?

I have had the honor of working with PPRM for 20 years. Supporting patient access and advocating for my team is of the utmost importance to me. Nothing compares to what is happening right now in Texas, Oklahoma, and at the U.S. Supreme Court. This is the most difficult. I cannot imagine what it must feel like to be a person in Texas needing and abortion, and what it will soon be for so many more people across our country. 

How are you feeling regarding the recent leaked SCOTUS opinion regarding the overturn of Roe?

I am outraged and saddened that instead of progress, we are going back. I am proud to be an abortion provider and I will continue to do whatever we need to help our patients get the care they need.   I worry about the folx that won’t get the care they need.

If Roe is overturned, how do you foresee the consequences will impact the valley/our local community?

  • Colorado is a safe haven state. We expect a surge in patient volume, we have already seen this since SB8 in Texas.
  • We already see patients from other states because of restricting laws
  • We are expanding Telehealth care and examining our processes to accommodate a higher patient volume.

How do you foresee the decision impacting Colorado as a whole? It seems that our legislators will move to safeguard abortion access, but could the upcoming mid-term election potentially alter that outcome? And how do you forsee the restrictive access to abortion in neighboring states, such as New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona, will impact the avaliablilites of clinics in CO?

Our health center is already seeing patients from our neighboring states. The unfortunate reality is that people are being forced out of their communities, must wait longer times, and travel further and further distances to access abortion care.

What do you forsee the direction of the abortions rights movement moving towards in the future? Is there hope?

The majority of people in our country support abortion access.

Lastly, how can we (especially the younger generation and as a community), help protect abortion rights and the access to safe health care for women?

  1. Vote
  2. Listen to people’s stories, tell yours, and keeping talking about health equity that includes abortion care
  3. Support the organizations that are advocating for reproductive rights and justice





{19-1392} Mandy Lei service project


safeguarding women’s healthcare.


All proceeds donated to Planned Parenthood.

First run sold out. 

Read update


More About the Design

Medusa:
In Greek Mythology, Medusa is painted as a monster that turns men into stone. Yet deeply misunderstood is the sexual assault written in her origin story and protection her snakes offer. In the design, I chose the allusion to Medusa’s story as a metaphor for the villanization and criminalization of a woman’s decision to get an abortion. Societal values and expectations force women to carry the enormous weight of guilt. But I’m a firm believer that we should remove this stigma of shaming women for making a decision relative to their lives. Everyone deserves kindness, love, and respect, even if their decisions don’t align with another’s beliefs.


Lady Justice:
The crown and scale of Lady Justice are sympathetic to the injustices imposed upon a woman’s autonomy over her physical and mental health due to the lack of safe medical resources. The paradox of the issue lies within the personal freedom protection offered by the 14th Amendment and the lack of “right to privacy” for women when it comes to reproductive health care. Additionally, extreme policies regarding abortion access does not accurately represent voters interests in red or blue states. And beyond our flawed legislative system, the symbols of Lady Justice also unveils the gray area between the planes of justice and morality.

19-1392:
19-1392 is the doc number assigned to the underlying case: Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, whcih was filed 3/19/2018 regarding the constitutionality of a Mississippi law that banned abortions after 15 weeks of preganacy. 

Inspo:
Passionate about the sociological crossroads of policy and society, I am always eager to learn about the relations between historical relevance and current events. And as a young women in America today, abortion legislations directly impacts my body, my mental health, and the trajectary of my life. Growing up in a conservative family, I am always forced to wrestle with the morality behind the weight of such decisions. Therefore, the purpose of this art piece is not only a method of advocating for my rights, but also a bridge between the gaps of my parents’ and I’s worldviews.
Artist Statement
As a young women in America today, abortion legislations directly impacts my body, my mental health, and the trajectary of my life. And growing up in a conservative family, I am always forced to wrestle with the morality behind the weight of such decisions. Therefore, the purpose of this art piece not only advocates for my rights, but also bridges the gap between my parents’ and my worldviews.

Bio
Growing up in the metropolis of Shanghai, China and making the odyssey to Cleveland, and then again to the Rocky Mountains, Mandy’s entire life is governed by movement and the excitement that accompanies exploration of the new. Taking art lessons since the age of 7, her art mainly revolved around traditional styles and mediums of acrylics and pencil. Driven by her personal identity as an Asian American and her involvement within the outdoor community, Mandy’s artistic style has evolved to integrate issues of racial and enviornmental justice. She is also experimenting with new mediums and styles such as: textiles, pointillism, ink, and now print-making at the Project Shop. Recently graduated from Colorado Rocky Mountain School, Mandy is taking a Gap Year to travel, before attending Pitzer College, where she is excited to participate in Claremont’s local art clubs and to explore Pitzer’s muralistic art scene.

About the Process
Holding myself accountable to give the project an informed foundation, I dedicated time to researching abortion rights and interviewed Rebecca Binion, director of the Planned Parenthood in Glenwood Springs. I distilled the web of information into one precise message: access to abortion is about providing safe health care for women, which should be an issue between a woman and her doctor.

Finally, I went back to the drawing board, drifting into my imaginative space and away from the logos and overthinking. Through the act of losing myself in creativity, I was able to weave meaningful elements into the design (which you can read more about at TheProjectShop.org). And, most importantly, I was able to see my designs come to life on sweatshirts, totes, tees and posters. The experience of carefully printing each piece of cloth, and knowing that 100% of my dedication to the project will be donated to Planned Parenthood, is truly rewarding.


Funding:
100% of profits made from the products will be donated to supporting @PlannedParenthood. Having reproductive healthcare facilities are important as it pertains to providing safe, accessible contraceptives, sex-ed, STI testings and treatments, and abortions. Additionally, to supplement the art project, I have contacted Rebecca Binion, the director of the Glenwood Planned Parenthood, for an interview regarding access to reproductive health care in the valley and how the potential overturn of Roe may impact our local community. You can check out the article @soprissun.